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Adrianne Walujo

Adrianne Walujo

Meet Indonesian designer based in Australia, Adrianne Walujo.

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I’m an Indonesian designer and illustrator based in Melbourne. Was doing a year of freelancing before working as a UX Motion Designer with a tech firm. I love visual design because I just enjoy solving problems and presenting the solutions in a way that is not only functional but beautiful to look at!

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.

It’s a beautiful city- I love meeting all types of people here who are kind and warm. It has a lovely charm that makes you feel at home.

 

It’s a beautiful city- I love meeting all types of people here who are kind and warm. It has a lovely charm that makes you feel at home.

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?

The best thing would be the diversity of people (and food yum!), and the worst thing would be… It can get too post-modern at times (happy to talk about this to anyone who is interested).

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.

Potential, disruptive, emerging.

 

How did you start your career in art?

After I graduated from animation course, I started freelancing as a designer with a brand agency for half a year while polishing my folio. Got my first big motion design project with the company I’m working now, an internship with my dream studio and things kicked off from then with more animation and illustration projects. I was initially really keen on working full-time, but to be honest I’ve really enjoyed the dynamics of working freelance as I got to meet and work with different people from different studios. However, at the moment, I want to commit to a team so I can grow as a creative and a person. I’ve been learning new things every time and I dare say that I’m still very early in my career now!

 

I was initially really keen on working full-time, but to be honest I’ve really enjoyed the dynamics of working freelance as I got to meet and work with different people from different studios.

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?

Yes, yes, yes! Wouldn’t be here without the support and encouragement from my family and friends. I stayed in Singapore for 4 years before living in Melbourne now- and I stopped drawing altogether during that period of time. There were too many factors for me to not pursue a creative field in university, I haven’t drawn in 4 years, due to moving overseas I had to wait an extra one year to apply to my course, I did not have folio so I might as well be rejected, etc. I was happy to pursue a double-degree study on economics and psychology as I received offers from multiple universities in Melbourne. That was when my parents asked me whether I would consider going to the creative field since they knew I loved drawing when I was little. Because of that I reconsidered my decision, took a leap of faith, rejected the offers and spent the remaining months just preparing myself and bracing for the worst. By God’s grace, I got accepted into my dream course and the rest is what it is. Really am grateful for these people in my life.

 

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?

I want to go into art direction in the future. Some milestones would be to publish an illustrated book and short animation for children. Also would love to have my own studio one day (haha who knows when), while also tutoring in university part-time.  Hoping to build a mentoring culture and bridging the gap between industry and university for young people.

 

Hoping to build a mentoring culture and bridging the gap between industry and university for young people.

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?

Jrcanest, no doubt. He is my motion design hero. Love the elegance he has in his work. But, I would love to collaborate with animators as I love the concept and art direction side of thing but will need someone who can bring them to life (there are just too many things to do by one person in a motion design project)!

 

How would you describe the women around you?

I’m blessed to be able to look up to women who are really admirable and talented. They have been compassionate, kind, strong and encouraging.

 

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?

Not really. Back in Indonesia, the creative industry was not as thriving as it is now, so that plus lack of exposure was probably some reasons why. 

 

Are there any challenging aspects of being a female in your industry?

I do find there are certain parts of the creative industry here that are very male-concentrated, I found it intimidating and found it hard to speak up in such condition. Plus, there are very, very few prominent women of colour figures in the animation industry in Australia, unlike in London or the States. I’m really hoping that the beautiful diversity I see in the general community can be reflected more in the industry moving forward.

 

Uni won’t teach you everything, but be exposed to different kinds of creative and people from all over the world- be inspired and know the myriad possibilities that you can achieve!

Do you have any advice to young women who are aspiring to work in your field?

If you are in school/ university, I would encourage you to expand your horizon beyond what uni teaches you. Uni won’t teach you everything, but be exposed to different kinds of creative and people from all over the world- be inspired and know the myriad possibilities that you can achieve! And then- this is the tricky part- don’t compare yourself with them, remember that it took people hours of practice, years of experience- don’t be intimidated but learn from them! We are more than our career, it is a part of us, perhaps a big part of us, but our worth does not lie on what we can do (thankfully!). This helps me to have peace when I get rejected, when my works are criticised, when I fail- it really is okay, because my intrinsic worth is not in my career or work.

 

Again, always happy to connect with anyone who wants to chat about this. As I said, I’m all for bridging the gap between education and the industry. 🙂

 

 

Photos courtesy of Adrianne Walujo.

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