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Goldie Poblador

Goldie Poblador

Meet Filipino visual artist based in New York City, Goldie Poblador.

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.
I grew up in Manila, and lived there consistently until around 2013. I went to art school in Manila and then left to further my studies in glass sculpture and contemporary art.

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.
New York is energetic, diverse and always moving. It reminds me a lot of Manila which is why I have grown to feel at home here.

 

New York is energetic, diverse and always moving. It reminds me a lot of Manila which is why I have grown to feel at home here.

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?
It is definitely challenging to live in New York. Competition is fierce no matter what field you are in. You have to be tough to live here and you have to learn to believe in yourself when no one else will. You have to be tough and you have to work hard. The best part about living here is precisely that – it is a double-edged sword. A lot of competent people come here to grow and perhaps one day, make it. Because as the saying goes, once you make it here you make it globally.

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.
Exhilarating, Challenging, Rewarding

 

How did you start your career in art?
I knew I wanted to be an artist when I was young. Perhaps at around 12, I realized it for sure. My parents appreciated the arts and made sure my siblings and I were exposed to museums, the theater, literature, and music. I think my turning point was getting to witness old Renaissance paintings and sculptures in the flesh. I remember staring at “The Birth of Venus” for an hour and deciding that I too wanted to be able to create something of lasting beauty.

 

I think my turning point was getting to witness old Renaissance paintings and sculptures in the flesh. I remember staring at “The Birth of Venus” for an hour and deciding that I too wanted to be able to create something of lasting beauty.

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?
Yes, as I mentioned I have been very lucky to have parents who supported my decision to become an artist. I initially was enrolled in Visual Communication when I was an undergrad in art school. I did it for a year and knew I had to scratch at my itch to create something that I truly believed in. I remember telling my parents and them expressing concern. They knew I would have financial challenges ahead of me and they were right. Through the years I have had to get by through day jobs to survive and to be able to purchase materials but I know that my family respects my decision.

 

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?
I would like my future work to be able to create an impact in the art scene in New York, both critically and politically. My work often addresses issues of identity and race in our society and how I, as a Filipina immigrant, am navigating through the challenges. I would like my work to be able to inspire people like me and encourage them to believe in themselves be it through the arts or through other fields. Technically as well, I would like to create bigger pieces and incorporate them into immersive experiences.

 

I would like my work to be able to inspire people like me and encourage them to believe in themselves be it through the arts or through other fields.

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?
I would probably choose to collaborate with any famed perfume house, in order to work on scent to incorporate into my installations. I often use scent in my pieces.

 

How would you describe the women around you?
Strong yet unafraid to be vulnerable when they need to be.

 

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?
Tons! I watched a lot of music gigs growing up and looked up to the female singers I would watch. I also looked up to my mother who was very feminine yet strong. She taught me the importance of culture and the arts as well as fostered my interest in the connection of body and mind through meditations and yoga.

 

Are there any challenging aspects of being a female in your industry?
Being a woman is tough in New York, and being an immigrant woman of color is even tougher. Racial discrimination still exists, whether or not people would like to admit this. The jobs and opportunities available to a woman like me are vastly different from those that are born here. I recognize as well however, that I have my own privileges, and this is what keeps me humble and sane when I am dealing with challenges that relate to my race, gender, and nationality.

 

Be humble if you succeed, and be even more humble when you don’t so you will be able to pick yourself back up the next day and acknowledge that you have to work harder.

Do you have any advice to young women who are aspiring to work in your field?
Put down your phone and look at social media less. Go out, have a walk, read a book, go to a museum and have a good conversation with a good friend. Find what fuels you and don’t be afraid to borrow from the great art pieces from history. Be humble if you succeed, and be even more humble when you don’t so you will be able to pick yourself back up the next day and acknowledge that you have to work harder. Try not to compare yourself to all these unrealistic standards that have been set.

 

 

Photos courtesy of Christina “Goldie” Poblador.

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