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Michelle Tang

Michelle Tang

Meet visual designer from Hong Kong, Michelle Tang.

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

Hello, I’m Michelle. I’m a Hong Kong-based visual designer who is passionate about branding, print production, and pandas. In the day time, I work on brand communications, packaging designs, and exhibition designs. At night, I work on initiatives for brands with potentials and seeking opportunities for collaboration.

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.

Hong Kong is a very unique city mixed with eastern and western culture. It was a former British Colony, then returned to China, and now it is running under Hong Kong’s own system. I believe mixing multiple cultural elements in our communications has become our own culture.

 

I believe mixing multiple cultural elements in our communications has become our own culture.

 

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?

The fusion of cultures brings strong energy and inspirations to the industry when people started to create new ideas with the old and the new, fusing traditional elements with modern touches together. But the competition here in Hong Kong has become more and more intensive, things we will always need is to keep improving yourself and never get too comfortable like you can’t be replaced.

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.

Adventurous, Spontaneous, Meticulous

 

How did you start your career in art?

I graduated from SCAD(Savannah College of Art and Design) with a BFA major in Graphic Design and minor in Advertising. My creative career begins with LaLa Curio, a luxury décor brand where I mastered my crafts. Currently, I work for Ambi Labs, an IoT company and overlooking the company’s branding and creative output.

 

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?

Yes, I am so lucky that my parents support me and respect me on what am I doing. This provides me the courage to face the challenge every day and continue my journey working as a creative.

 

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?

As a print enthusiast, I have to say unfortunately the world’s moving digital. However, I believe print never dies because the ability to be able to interreact with people tangibly is irreplaceable. I really love the execution stage where I can play with a lot of materials, finishing and printing methods. I wish that I could create tangible designs that speak to people’s soul in the modern digital world.

 

I believe print never dies because the ability to be able to interreact with people tangibly is irreplaceable.

 

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?

Hayao Miyazaki, Japan’s godfather of animation and always one of the greatest artist in the world. I admire him so, so much. There’s no doubt that he illuminated the film industry with his fantastical stunning imagery and emotional narratives. His influences through his artistic style and narrative have become works of cinematic masterpieces in the field of animations. I really appreciated him a lot on adopting traditional animation methods, drawing each frame by hand in his production, and still continuing the traditions today.

 

How would you describe the women around you?

Strong and independent. They are like flowers, all different but all beautiful.

 

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?

MW Wong from Hong Kong, she is my motivation to continue doing printed matters, and I am hoping to meet her in the workplace someday. She inspired me a lot on print execution and showing the world how a message can be told on printed papers.

 

Are there any challenging aspects of being a female in your industry?

With women still pushing to reach the top, they are faced with a range of challenges that many of the male counterparts don’t have an understanding of. But I think women are being treated equally in my industry, and once we are confident, speaking up for yourself and trusting your own voice, I believe that all difficulties and failure are the stepping stone to success.

 

Once we are confident, speaking up for yourself and trusting your own voice, I believe that all difficulties and failure are the stepping stone to success.

 

Do you have any advice to young women who are aspiring to work in your field?

Always take initiatives to work on different briefs, and from there, learn the skills you needed to execute the idea from tutorial videos or your seniors, then apply it on the work right away. You’ll find out you learn much faster this way than going for any random skills that fascinate you.

 

 

Photos courtesy of Michelle Tang.

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