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Pei-Hsin Cho

Pei-Hsin Cho

Meet Taiwanese illustrator currently based in London, Pei-Hsin Cho.

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I’m raised in Taoyuan, Taiwan and finished my BA in animation in Taipei city, which is the capital city of Taiwan. Currently, I’m based in London, UK, finishing my master’s degree at the Royal College of Art in Visual Communication.

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.

Taoyuan and Taipei are just next to each other. I would say Taoyuan is great for living that anything is accessible in short distance, and Taipei is great for creative events.

 

I would say Taoyuan is great for living that anything is accessible in short distance, and Taipei is great for creative events.

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?

Now I am living in London for almost 2 years, the best thing for me is that amazing art exhibitions are always happening in this city and the exhibition and the museum/gallery environment are usually well-curated and visitor friendly. Sir John Soane’s Museum is my favorite, even though it’s not as popular as other tourist attractions, I would still highly recommend anyone who visits London should go! The worst thing that I still can’t get used to is the dirtiness in the bus… it happens a lot that there are food and trash on the seats.

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.

I haven’t started working yet but I think in London the art industry is open-minded, active, and blending in daily life. So for a creative in London, there’s a lot of potentials to utilize his/her skills.

 

How did you start your career in art?

I started studying fine art since elementary school, animation in college and visual communication in masters. I started to work as a freelance illustrator and animator since 2015.

 

I started studying fine art since elementary school, animation in college and visual communication in masters. I started to work as a freelance illustrator and animator since 2015.

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?

Luckily yes and really appreciate their support.

 

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?

I am almost finishing my masters and will start my full time working life soon! I’m open to any kind of cooperation because I don’t want to limit the working format that I would like to challenge myself applying my style and work into different possibilities.

 

I’m open to any kind of cooperation because I don’t want to limit the working format that I would like to challenge myself applying my style and work into different possibilities.

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?

I’m really interested in psychology and would like to work with publishers in any format like picture books, editorial illustrations or posters.

 

How would you describe the women around you?

I grew up in a single parent family. My father’s side of the family was also similar in a way that women are supporting the family. Since I was a kid, I witness my mom and grandmother living their own best self as an independent woman in their era. It wasn’t easy at all for them because, at that time in Taiwan, the whole society was still very traditional and conservative regarding on the norms of the role of male and female in society and family. I learned a lot from those old-fashioned values and trying to continue breaking them as my mother and grandmother did.

 

I learned a lot from those old-fashioned values and trying to continue breaking them as my mother and grandmother did.

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?

I have one pop up in mind but it’s a male illustrator, Jimmy Liao. I think Taiwanese around my age are all familiar with his work. The way his storytelling influenced me to start developing narratives in image making.

 

Are there any challenging aspects of being a female in your industry?

I think not only for females but also males, whoever does art for a living would be seen as making a risky decision.  

 

I always believe that narrative is more important than just a nice pretty drawing because that’s what you will leave in the viewer’s heart afterward.

 

Do you have any advice to young women who are aspiring to work in your field?
I am also trying to figure this industry out currently lol. But I would say, I always believe that narrative is more important than just a nice pretty drawing because that’s what you will leave in the viewer’s heart afterward.

 

 

Photos courtesy of Pei-Hsin Cho.

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