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Pei-hsiu Chen

Pei-hsiu Chen

Meet illustrator from Taipei, Pei-hsiu Chen.

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I am a freelance illustrator. My works could be found in some of Taiwan’s magazines and children’s books. In recent years, I also started to create personal picture books. Usually, I’m making works both by computer graphics and hand painting. I also try to create something different in terms of style such as printmaking or little press fanzines.

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.

People usually describe the capital city, Taipei, as “busy” or ” tough ” but because I work at home, the traffic jam and the rush life seem far away from me. There is always a lot of cultural activities here and there are nice bookstores too. But this city is not perfect. There are a lot of ugly buildings and advertisements but I tend to appreciate the good parts.

 

People usually describe the capital city, Taipei, as “busy” or ” tough ” but because I work at home, the traffic jam and the rush life seem far away from me.

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?

The best is that it is easy to find good cafes and delicious food here.

The worst is the changing weather the rental getting higher and higher.

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.

leisurely, malleability, mix/match

 

How did you start your career in art?
After graduating, I tried to find some cases of illustrations, and learn from different works. At first, I drew some illustrations for children’s magazines and children’s books. The pay and contents are not so attractive for me, but I also didn’t draw so good, so there were several years I did them for practice. Then I tried to attend some international competitions, got some success, and started to draw personal picture books and short comics. Now I am doing my first graphic novel.

 

After graduating, I tried to find some cases of illustrations, and learn from different works.

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?

My family was a little worried about my financial state, but actually, I don’t really care about what others are thinking.

 

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?

No matter what kind of project I’ll do, I hope to always be serious and honest. I also want to continue to have a wide range of learning.

 

No matter what kind of project I’ll do, I hope to always be serious and honest. I also want to continue to have a wide range of learning.

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?

Haruki Murakami 

 

How would you describe the women around you?
In my family, women are pragmatic. Perhaps because their life had some tough experiences. They don’t talk about poetry or fantastic subjects. That probably made an influence on my thinking.

 

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?
When I was an elementary school student, I met a lady who taught us art. Her teachings were innovative. She paid attention to the students who are talented and earnest and gave us some help in competitions and entrance exams. In my opinion, she was the first artist I met.

 

Are there any challenging aspects of being a female in your industry?
We work on the internet, no need to be face to face or go to an office, so the glass ceiling usually doesn’t exist.
Women might encounter situations where someone who wants to praise their work would say: your work is so good that it is difficult to identify if it’s created by a girl/woman.

 

Learn more things about other fields, that might help you link with the real world.

Do you have any advice to young women who are aspiring to work in your field?
Learn more things about other fields, that might help you link with the real world.

 

 

Photos courtesy of Chen Pei-hsiuChen.

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