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Wu Yanrong

Wu Yanrong

Meet graphic designer and illustrator from Singapore, Wu Yanrong.

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.
Hey, I’m Yanrong, a graphic designer and illustrator.

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.

I love Singapore, it’s home. Unlike many others, I like hot weather. Food is cheap and good, I like our Singlish and how you’re able to casually meet friends for a quick supper because everyone/everything is close by. I don’t like that Singaporeans take Singapore for granted.

 

I love Singapore, it’s home.

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?
Best thing – safe, comfortable, efficient and convenient.
Worst thing – not being able to (1) have a big workspace without paying an insane sum of money (2) surf and snowboard (3) go on a road/camping trip

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.

Good and bad.

 

How did you start your career in art?

As with many creatives, I started doing art really young. I went on to get my diploma and bachelor in Communication Design before working as a full-time graphic designer at WORK. My 4 years there have helped shape the way I see and do things, I was also fortunate enough to be able to illustrate for many projects. Outside of work, painting in my personal time helps improve my skills as well as allow people to know more about what I do.

 

As with many creatives, I started doing art really young.

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?
I’m lucky because my parents have never questioned or objected to what I’m doing or were studying despite being clueless. Also, a lot of my friends are creatives.

 

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?
I’ve always loved storytelling and want to have narratives in my illustrations. When I first started drawing, it was very free – I drew what I want without any consideration of style or skill. When I decided to take things seriously, I think I lost that freedom.
The past years have been about finding a style and honing the craft. While I enjoy what I did, it also feels very practical. I’ve been trying to forget what I know and draw without a purpose and at the same time, be a designer/illustrator. I can sort of feel a balance now so it feels right to add another dimension to my work.
Ultimately, my goal is to create works that have many depths but also to constantly grow and evolve as a creative.

 

Ultimately, my goal is to create works that have many depths but also to constantly grow and evolve as a creative.

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?

Wong Kar-Wai.

 

How would you describe the women around you?
Strong, independent and capable.

 

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?

Unfortunately no but then again, when I was growing up, I wasn’t interested in the creative industry. I wasn’t curious about the people or their works – I just wanna do my own thing.

 

Are there any challenging aspects of being a female in your industry?
I don’t think there are any for me – my age is more of a factor than my gender.

 

The world is your oyster. Work hard, work smart and persevere.

Do you have any advice to young women who are aspiring to work in your field?
The world is your oyster. Work hard, work smart and persevere.

 

 

Photos courtesy of Wu Yanrong.

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