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Ysa Yaneza

Ysa Yaneza

Meet singer-songwriter-producer from Singapore, Ysa Yaneza.

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I’m Ysa! Singer-songwriter-producer from Singapore.

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.

Singapore is a very clean and organized country, and I always feel blessed that I live here.

 

Singapore is a very clean and organized country, and I always feel blessed that I live here.

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?

The best thing about living in Singapore is that it’s always bustling, but at the same time, it can be quite tranquil, knowing that you can walk around at any time of the day, without having to worry. I love wandering around and daydreaming a lot on days where I don’t have any commitments. The worst thing would be, some days, the heat really takes its toll!

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.

Persistence, a challenge, and blossoming.

 

How did you start your career in art?

I have always been experimenting with different softwares on my computer ever since I had full access to them. I remember being 9, and I would create blogskins on photoshop, learn how to code to arrange my blog, and then try to make my own music on GarageBand. I also remember using a Sony Ericsson phone and making my own ringtones.

 

It was only when I was 18 when I got very intrigued by electronic music production, and I started messing around on Fruity Loops (FL Studio). I remember writing my first song on FL Studio and I thought it was magical. I moved on to Logic and that was when I decided to take music seriously. It was my Summer Break in 2016 and I was in my bedroom all day, writing and composing. “Tea” was one of the songs. I’d watch YouTube tutorials on how to record vocals and how to mix tracks. I worked on a few songs that summer but “Tea” was the one that I wanted the world to hear.

 

I remember writing my first song on FL Studio and I thought it was magical. I moved on to Logic and that was when I decided to take music seriously.

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?

I’m very grateful to be in a family that gave me the opportunity to hone my skills in the arts ever since at a young age. I think the moment they saw me grab the microphone at age 2 (I couldn’t even talk at this time), they knew I wanted to be a performer.

 

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?

Aside from music, I’d love to work on movies, be it behind or in front of the camera. I love telling stories, especially ones that inspire youth and young women.

 

Aside from music, I’d love to work on movies, be it behind or in front of the camera. I love telling stories, especially ones that inspire youth and young women.

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?

Backstreet Boys. I actually own all of their physical CDs and have listened to each track.

 

How would you describe the women around you?

Most of my days, I am surrounded by women who are go-getters. I remember thinking about my grandmas and how they worked all their life; raising their children and running businesses, big and small. I also think of my own mother, she is the reason why my family had the chance to relocate from the Philippines to Singapore. I thought it was typical for mothers to be the one working most of the time, so at a young age, I knew it was possible for women to be front runners.

 

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?

I remember watching local TV as a kid and feeling like I couldn’t look up to anyone because the women I saw on TV did not look like me. At times it felt unattainable to reach my dreams, primarily because of my background and appearance. But I eventually learned that your uniqueness will help you stand out, and if nobody looked like me on screen, then I’ll be the first person to look like myself.

 

I eventually learned that your uniqueness will help you stand out, and if nobody looked like me on screen, then I’ll be the first person to look like myself.

Are there any challenging aspects of being a female in your industry?

As a female producer, it is inevitable that there may be preconceived notions about your knowledge and skill. And as a female in music, there will be people who will make judgments on the way you sound and look. I kind of just embrace the challenges and let it push me to work hard.

 

Do you have any advice to young women who are aspiring to work in your field?

Be yourself and do what makes you happy. If you fail, try again.

 

 

Photos courtesy of Ysa Yaneza.

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