back to top
  /    /  Sonia Calico

Sonia Calico

Sonia Calico

Meet electronic music producer & DJ from Taipei, Sonia Calico.
Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I’m an electronic music producer/ DJ based in Taipei. Owning a label called UnderU, releasing music, throwing events, and workshops.

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.

Even though Taipei is the capital city of Taiwan, the city feels very intimate to me sometimes. Especially when it comes to music/ art community, everyone knows each other, goes to each other’s events and helps each other out which I really enjoy.

 

Even though Taipei is the capital city of Taiwan, the city feels very intimate to me sometimes. Especially when it comes to music/ art community, everyone knows each other, goes to each other’s events and helps each other out which I really enjoy.

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?

Like I mentioned from the last question, Taipei is a small intimate city, it’s comfortable to live here, everyone is pretty chill. Compare to other metropolitan cities I’ve visited before, people here enjoy a slower pace of living. However as a creative artist, sometimes you don’t feel much motivated, there are not as many people devoted to the similar underground culture. It’s less competitive between artists in a way… but sometimes I wish there are more interesting stuff happening all the time.

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.

friendly, intimate, humid

 

How did you start your career in art?

I was very into indie rock music when I was in high school, I had an electronic punk girl band called Go Chic. I was playing guitar, keyboard & drum machine in the band. The band stopped a few years ago and I started focusing on my own production as Sonia Calico.

 

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?

Yes, I feel really lucky. My mom is actually the most supportive person of my music career, there were several times I wanted to quit and she has been the one reminded me not to lose my faith.

 

My mom is actually the most supportive person of my music career, there were several times I wanted to quit and she has been the one reminded me not to lose my faith.

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?

Recently I focus more on expanding my ideas from music to the other forms of creation such as video work, choreography, short stories maybe into some kinda interactive exhibition in the future too. I don’t really have big goals anymore, I have small goals project by project. If I can keep being inspired and creating new stuff, I’d be happy enough!

 

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?

I would love to collaborate with some really cool edgy animation producer or dance choreographer, I don’t really have a list of names but every time when I saw interesting works, I would imagine how cool it can be if we work together. 

 

How would you describe the women around you?

I grew up with women who are hardworking, educated with a strong sense of personality. Like my mom and my aunties, they all excel in their professional careers. That kinda shaped who I am since my childhood, unlike the traditional Taiwanese value for women to be obedient and self-restrained, I was not too afraid to be out of frame, knowing that women can be anything that they want to be.

 

Unlike the traditional Taiwanese value for women to be obedient and self-restrained, I was not too afraid to be out of frame, knowing that women can be anything that they want to be.

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?

Well, there were a few women that people think were creative… I admire them but I tend to flow more in another direction. As a matter of fact, I grew up in a society where women seem to have a stereotypical notion of what creative women are. They could be some kinda pop star but that didn’t really resonate with me. It was until when I started listening to western indie music that I found female artists who I looked up to. For example, Canadian artist Peaches and Germany based group Chicks On Speed. They really planted the awareness of being a female creative artist inside me.

Are there any challenging aspects of being a female in your industry?

Yeah, all the time. I have to be extra professional and cautious for work so they don’t have any chance to put the “because you’re a woman so you….” hat on me. To be beautiful and confident without being objectified. To understand all the weakness they thought we have is actually where our strength comes from. Every decisive moment is important, they’re bigger than just ourselves… For example, would you play at an event with a big crowd but they ask all the female acts to dress “alluring”… We have to think through all these aspects constantly and reflect with our own minds in order to find our true power.

 

Just be brave and don’t be afraid of making mistakes. The most important thing is to have fun. Find the part in the creative process that really gives you happiness and build your work from it. No need to force yourself to things just because they said you have to.

Do you have any advice to young women who are aspiring to work in your field?

Just be brave and don’t be afraid of making mistakes. The most important thing is to have fun. Find the part in the creative process that really gives you happiness and build your work from it. No need to force yourself to things just because they said you have to.

 

 

Photos courtesy of Sonia Calico.

Instagram:

Facebook:

Category:
Date:
3Like