back to top
  /    /  Alyssa De Asis

Alyssa De Asis

Alyssa De Asis

Meet Filipino designer and illustrator, Alyssa De Asis

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I’m a designer and illustrator from the Philippines. Working digitally, I like to create vibrant, light-hearted and whimsical illustrations mostly for children’s books.

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.

I live and grew up in Sta. Rosa but I travel back and forth living in Manila ever since I was in college. I like the balance of living in the busy city of Manila but also have a chance to be able to come back home to the quiet and chill life in Sta. Rosa, where it’s closer to nature.

 

I like the balance of living in the busy city of Manila but also have a chance to be able to come back home to the quiet and chill life in Sta. Rosa, where it’s closer to nature.

 

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?

In Manila, there’s always an event you can go to, like art exhibits and museums to check out, gigs to watch, new restaurants to try. You can easily expose yourself to the flourishing creativity all around you. The worst is the heavy traffic and pollution.

In Sta. Rosa, it’s a lot more peaceful and quiet. There are trees everywhere and I literally wake up to birds chirping by the window. Worst is it’s hard to travel here without a car.

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.

thriving, challenging & exciting

 

How did you start your career in art?

I’ve always been interested in art ever since I was a kid. After graduating with a Fine Arts degree in college, I became a graphic designer for 3 years in a marketing company and a year and a half in an advertising agency. Back then, I thought being in advertising was where I was meant to work in, having majored in Visual Design in college and learning so much about advertising for years, but I realized it wasn’t really for me and I didn’t truly enjoy what I was doing. Outside of work though, I was exposed to a lot of illustrators locally and internationally, which made me realize it’s a possible career that I can delve myself into. During all these times, I still continued to draw in my free time and eventually took the leap to become a freelance illustrator. It’s been a challenging journey but has been the best decision I’ve made. I’m very grateful I was able to get an illustration agency to represent me from the beginning, who was able to help me start my career in a global scale. I still love doing graphic design work and do it part time now.

 

It’s been a challenging journey but has been the best decision I’ve made.

 

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?

Yes, I was fortunate enough to have supportive parents from the start, even when they weren’t familiar with the creative industry and what work I’d be able to do.

 

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?

As much as I’d love to continue illustrating children’s books, I don’t want to limit myself to just that. I’d love to create more illustrations for editorials, advertising, packaging, etc.

 

As much as I’d love to continue illustrating children’s books, I don’t want to limit myself to just that. I’d love to create more illustrations for editorials, advertising, packaging, etc.

 

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?

I don’t have a particular person in mind, but I would love to able to work with bigger publishers and brands.

 

How would you describe the women around you?

Growing up, I was surrounded by a lot women since I studied in an all-girls school from elementary to college. All were strong, supportive, loving and empowering of each other. I grew up in an environment valuing women empowerment and gender equality.

 

All were strong, supportive, loving and empowering of each other. I grew up in an environment valuing women empowerment and gender equality.

 

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?

There were foreign female musicians and actresses that I looked up but no local female artists. I grew up learning art from watching Neil Buchanan from Art Attack and reading comics, like W.i.t.c.h. and strips from the newspaper, kids magazines, cartoons and children’s books. I wasn’t exposed to a lot of artists back then, but now I’m grateful for having a long list of female creatives that I look up to, not only in the Philippines but from different parts of the world.

 

Are there any challenging aspects of being a female in your industry?

I’m lucky enough not to experience any challenges specifically pertaining to my gender. The focus has always been more towards my works.

 

Make art everyday and always keep practicing.

 

Do you have any advice to young women who are aspiring to work in your field?

Make art everyday and always keep practicing. One day, you won’t even realize how far you’ve improved and how much you’ve learned. And don’t be shy to promote your works, you’ll never know where that may lead to and whoever might come across it.

 

 

Photos courtesy of Alyssa De Asis.

Instagram:

Category:
Date:
4