back to top
  /    /  Vicky Pasion

Vicky Pasion

Vicky Pasion

Meet singer-songwriter and performer from London, Vicky Pasion.

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I’m Vicky Pasion, a singer-songwriter and performer. I’m a geeky introvert that comes alive under the spotlight!

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.

I’m currently in LA but was born and raised in London. I’m from Camden, North West London, and love its multi-cultural energy. The city has a thrumming rhythm and is full of creative opportunities.

 

To me, the best thing about living in London are its gorgeous open spaces and parks that provide mental and physical space amidst the busy hustle.

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?

To me, the best thing about living in London are its gorgeous open spaces and parks that provide mental and physical space amidst the busy hustle. The worst thing – I guess the grey winters; they can be challenging at times!

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.

Empowering, stimulating and fun.

 

How did you start your career in music?

Well, my background is in musical theatre – I was Young Nala in Disney’s ‘The Lion King’ and the Lead Female Singer in ‘Thriller Live’ – both on the West End. In 2017, I was experiencing intense shifts in my personal and professional life, and songwriting became a way to process these changes. That summer, I recorded and released my first mixtape, ‘Life is but a Vapour’, released a short documentary ‘Limit Less’ (2018), and recently launched my debut EP ‘Valley of the Ashes’ at the O2 Academy2, Islington. I haven’t looked back since!

 

I’m so grateful to say that I now have a team of people around me who genuinely see me for me – it helps to create an open and safe space to play!

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?

Thankfully, my mum has always been very supportive of my creative career. From young, she’s invested in my education and has worked relentlessly to make sure that I’ve had everything I’ve needed to sharpen my craft. I’ve always had a strong network of people to lean on; however, in recent years, I’ve definitely needed to let go of people who shared energy that no longer felt supportive or helpful to my growth. I’m very serious about the circle of energy that surrounds me, so last year I took the time to organically build a team that I respect and admire. I’m so grateful to say that I now have a team of people around me who genuinely see me for me – it helps to create an open and safe space to play!

 

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?

So many! I’m an ambitious person, always striving to create honest work that has the potential to connect, heal and empower as many people as possible in the process. I’ve just created and released my debut EP ‘Valley of the Ashes’, the first of four music/visual projects, and I’m excited for all the other opportunities that these projects have already sparked.

 

I’m an ambitious person, always striving to create honest work that has the potential to connect, heal and empower as many people as possible in the process.

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?

Right now, I’d love to collaborate with Raveena Aurora. Her music and aura is so enchanting; I love how she explores her sexuality and South Asian heritage so intelligently and beautifully. So effortless.

 

How would you describe the women around you?

The womxn around me are full of purpose and drive. They are strong, mindful and feel like sunshine.

 

The womxn around me are full of purpose and drive.

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?

That’s so sad – I’m finding it difficult to think of someone. I didn’t really have anyone local that I could look up to growing up. Mostly, I immersed myself in books and autobiographies, drawn to stories of womxn who have had similar working-class backgrounds, all working hard, with love and great intentions, to reach their goals.

 

Are there any challenging aspects of being a female in your industry?

For sure. Last year I had meetings with music execs and found it so shocking and sad that one of the first points of focus was my image. On first look, I’m petite and unassuming, and completely understand that aesthetics is a language that enhances the experience of music; however, I find it challenging to be in spaces where my image is confined, and I’ve tentatively yet proudly walked away from ‘opportunities’ that belittle me in that way. There’s definitely growing representation, in terms of womxn of colour raising their voices and allowing themselves to be seen and heard. When collaborating, I’ve made it a priority to champion other BAME female talent and I’m excited to be a part of this movement.

 

Go for it! Life is too short to hold ourselves back.

Do you have any advice to young women who are aspiring to work in your field?

Go for it! Life is too short to hold ourselves back. Take your time to check-in with yourself and to realise that you have a story to share. Surround yourself with people who love you and simply want you to be happy. Then, create. It’s all within you…

I’ll leave you with a quote from one of my favourite authors, F. Scott Fitzgerald: “For what it’s worth… it’s never too late, or in my case too early, to be whoever you want to be. There’s no time limit. Start whenever you want. You can change or stay the same. There are no rules to this thing. We can make the best or the worst of it. I hope you make the best of it. I hope you see things that startle you. I hope you feel things you’ve never felt before. I hope you meet people who have a different point of view. I hope you live a life you’re proud of, and if you’re not, I hope you have the courage to start over again.”

 

 

Photos courtesy of Emily Almodovar

Styling: Emily Macfie

MUA: Tasnim Nahar

Design: RAYA

Instagram:

Apple Music:

Amazon Music:

Category:
Date:
3