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Hana Eunjin Yean

Hana Eunjin Yean

Meet LA-based art director, Hana Eunjin Yean.

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I am currently an Art Director at Gentleman Scholar, a motion design studio. I design and direct design-driven commercials for clients in various industries. My favorite project is a 2D illustration-based piece. I found my passion for Motion Graphics while I was attending Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles. The best part of this industry is that I can tell stories through different mediums with many talented individuals.

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.

Los Angeles can be a little crazy. I always thought of L.A. to be just like what I saw in Hollywood movies; a gorgeous, beautiful, and stunning city. But, soon I realized that the reality was very different. It was colder, dirtier and sketchier than what I imagined and got disappointed very fast. However, I experienced such a variety of culture, food, and music and started to fall in its unique atmosphere. There is so much that L.A. offers and I call it home now.

Growing up in three different cities makes me feel like I’m a lost alien sometimes; having no real home and floating from places to places. Now I feel so lucky and fortunate to have three homes all around the world and that I have people in these cities I call my family.

 

The best part of this industry is that I can tell stories through different mediums with many talented individuals.

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?

The best, FOOD.

The worst, COCKROACHES.

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.

CONNECTED

REPRESENTED

INSPIRING

 

How did you start your career in art?

The art was part of my life ever since I could remember. I loved doing crafts and wanted to be an origami teacher or an inventor when I was a kid.

Knowing that I was into the arts, my parents sent me to an arts school in Korea. However, I did not really enjoy this time of my life because the education in Korea was so refrained and art was treated like math, measuring every corner.

Then I found my passion for art again when I moved to Toronto, where I felt like I had the room and freedom to explore and express myself. I finally found my dream when I came to Los Angeles.

I studied Illustration at the Art Center College of Design, taking traditional painting and drawing classes. Then, I took an intro to motion design class just out of curiosity. It was completely out of my comfort zone and was challenging. However, seeing all the animation coming together to life felt so rewarding and led me to take this path.

 

I took an intro to motion design class just out of curiosity. It was completely out of my comfort zone and was challenging. However, seeing all the animation coming together to life felt so rewarding and led me to take this path.

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?

My parents acknowledged that I was a creative soul ever since I could remember. My mom loves arts and she took me to galleries since I was young and that influenced me to this creative career. It was a very natural path for me to go into art/design and I think my family would’ve been surprised if I chose to do something else.

 

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?

To be able to convey emotions and feelings through my work. I want to inspire youth and be a good role model for kids I once was.

 

To be able to convey emotions and feelings through my work. I want to inspire youth and be a good role model for kids I once was.

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?

I would be honored to collaborate with any talented artists who have passion for what they do!

 

How would you describe the women around you?

Women around me are strong, smart, and independent. I met a lot of talented hardworking female friends in school. We all inspired each other to work harder and helped one another to achieve our goals.

 

Women around me are strong, smart, and independent.

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?

Mmm, I would say my art teacher in my high school in Toronto. She was a charismatic teacher. Before meeting her, I only liked doing life-like paintings and was very into technical drawings. She taught me to think outside the box and to think abstract. She introduced me to a lot of contemporary painters like Jenny Savile and Kent Williams. I wanted to be like her and help guide the younger artists like her when I grow up.

 

Are there any challenging aspects of being a female in your industry?

I think people in our industry or at least the people I’ve met, are not suppressive or demeaning towards females. It never occurred to me that they treated me falsely because I’m a woman.

It was rather the voice inside me that was giving me a hard time. The self-doubt. I caught myself doing this few times, when I talk to clients or meet new freelancers, I found myself thinking, “I must look so unprofessional to them because I’m a tiny Asian girl. How can people trust me and follow my lead when I look like this?” Luckily, I had my trusting co-workers and friends beside me and helped me get through that phase. Now I know that I’m worthy and a reliable designer/art director. I am confident that I deliver good work whenever and wherever I’m needed.

 

Trust yourself. Don’t let anyone make you doubt your dream.

Do you have any advice to young women who are aspiring to work in your field?

Trust yourself. Don’t let anyone make you doubt your dream.

 

 

Photos courtesy of Hana Eunjin Yean.

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