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Joyce N. Ho

Joyce N. Ho

Meet director and motion designer from Brooklyn, Joyce N. Ho

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Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I was born in HK and moved to Australia when I was 4 years old. A couple of years ago, I moved here to Brooklyn to freelance. I’ve been working in the motion design industry for the last decade, where I specialise in directing and leading design in animation projects.

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.

I’ve always wanted to live in NYC. I came here as a tourist in my early 20’s and on the very first day, I just knew that I wanted to live here one day. I live in Brooklyn where it’s not as hustle and bustle as Manhattan, and it’s got more of a neighbourhood vibe. Being from HK, I think living in big cities will always be in my blood!

 

Being from HK, I think living in big cities will always be in my blood!

 

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?

The best thing about living in NY is the amount of amazing food that can be found here! That was one of the huge draw points for me moving here, as food has always been a big part of my life because of my Chinese heritage and also the fact that my mum is a food blogger. The worst thing would be the high rent; it’s generally quite expensive to live here.

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.

Inspiring, incomparable, and overwhelming

 

How did you start your career in art?

I’ve always been a creative person, and as a kid, I loved to draw and make paper crafts. Growing up in the 90’s, I watched a steady stream of cartoons that made the time right after school where I got to do that, my favourite time of the day. It was through those shows that first sparked the idea of becoming an animator. By the time I was in university, studying fine arts with a major in Animation, I was torn between my interest in design and animation, but neither felt like a perfect fit for me. It was then that I discovered motion design in one of my first year subjects. Motion design seemed like it encompassed all the things that I loved most about design and animation.

 

Motion design seemed like it encompassed all the things that I loved most about design and animation.

 

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?

Yes, 100%. I was, and continue to be, really grateful for my family, particularly for my parents. They were always supportive of my creative goals and they encouraged me to follow my passions.

 

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?

I would love to continue to create work for film and TV. I would also love to explore more work in experiential design, as there’s something really special in seeing digital work out in the real world and be able to experience it in a different way, outside the computer screen.

 

I would love to continue to create work for film and TV.

 

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?

I have so many dream collaborators! I would love to work with Karin Fong, Ava DuVernay, Wes Anderson, Lulu Wang, Floating Points & The xx, just to name a few.

 

How would you describe the women around you?

I would describe the women around me as strong, creative, empathetic and kind.

 

I would describe the women around me as strong, creative, empathetic and kind.

 

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?

Unfortunately, I wasn’t aware of local female creatives when I was growing up. I’m sure there were out there, but growing up in the early 90’s, when it was just the early days of the internet, that information was just hard to find as a kid! On top of that, most of the prominent creatives you’d hear about back then were all men. I’m so glad that nowadays, female creatives are getting the recognition they deserve, so that it will be easier for younger people, and people just starting out, to be exposed to their work and can have them as role models.

 

Are there any challenging aspects of being a female in your industry?

Motion design and the greater design industry, is still dominated by men, especially in leadership positions. So as women, we’re still the minority and it can be difficult to get equal footing. But the good thing is that I’ve noticed more and more women in leadership design roles. It’s slow progress, but it is happening. And now that we are all more consciously aware of how important diversity and representation is, it will only get better!

 

Be patient and give yourself some time to figure out your style and what your strengths are.

 

Do you have any advice to young women who are aspiring to work in your field?

Be patient and give yourself some time to figure out your style and what your strengths are. I know that when I was first starting out, I was putting pressure on myself to have it all figured out, that I’d wish someone had told me then that that will come naturally with time and experience. Another thing is to try and find a community of women who you can turn to for advice and support. The friendships I’ve made in the industry are some of my most treasured ones in my life!

 

 

Photos and videos courtesy of Joyce N. Ho

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