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REIKA

REIKA

Meet 3D artist from Metro Manila, REIKA

GirlsclubAsia-Artist-Aya-Reika

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I’m REIKA—a half-Japanese and half-Filipino creative based in Manila. I specialize in music video direction, graphic design, and 3D visuals.

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.

I live in a high-rise building at the heart of Taguig City. I’m an indoor person and I always like to look out the window and observe the city whenever I need to take a break from work.

 

Though the city itself is really busy, I find certain calmness and comfort from watching everyone go about their daily lives.

 

Though the city itself is really busy, I find certain calmness and comfort from watching everyone go about their daily lives.

 

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?

The best thing is definitely convenience! Whether it’s craving for pizza at 3 AM or buying groceries when I don’t have time to, I know they’re just a few clicks away.

 

On the flip side, I live in a city where basic necessities can be a bit pricey. I found that the best workaround is to be smart with finances. I also like to support small businesses as much as I can because expensive doesn’t always mean best.

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.

Fast-paced, lively, and inspiring

 

How did you start your career in art?

I was 15 years old when I started getting into basic editing, and like most creatives, I began with creating fanart for my favorite pop artist at the time. It took me a few years to learn the ropes until I got my first client work when I was 18.

I did a lot of logos for DJs at the beginning of my career, and it eventually branched out to Press Kits, VJ Loops, Event Posters, etc., until I had my first commission work from an independent artist. Fast forward to now, my usual clients are musicians and record labels.

 

I was 15 years old when I started getting into basic editing, and like most creatives, I began with creating fanart for my favorite pop artist at the time. It took me a few years to learn the ropes until I got my first client work when I was 18.

I did a lot of logos for DJs at the beginning of my career, and it eventually branched out to Press Kits, VJ Loops, Event Posters, etc., until I had my first commission work from an independent artist. Fast forward to now, my usual clients are musicians and record labels.

 

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?

My parents never really forced a specific career path on me, so even though they initially pegged me as a lawyer or doctor, they were okay with my career choice as long as I am able to support myself.

 

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?

Motion capture and advanced 3D Animation are just some of the many skills I want to dive deeper in. I am in a very competitive industry so the way I handle this is by continuously learning and adapting. I want to better understand the depths of my work, as well as challenge myself to push the limits of my imagination.

 

Motion capture and advanced 3D Animation are just some of the many skills I want to dive deeper in. I am in a very competitive industry so the way I handle this is by continuously learning and adapting. I want to better understand the depths of my work, as well as challenge myself to push the limits of my imagination.

 

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?

A dream collaboration of mine would be Lil Nas X. I think that he brings so much to the table video-wise, and the amount of thought put into every one of his releases is inspiring.

 

What are the biggest challenges you face in working as a creative?

Burnout. Working in front of a computer for hours on end definitely takes a toll on my mental and physical health.

 

Powerful and independent. All the women in my family and circle of friends share these traits

 

How would you describe the women around you?

Powerful and independent. All the women in my family and circle of friends share these traits.

 

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?

None, unfortunately. The creative industry where I’m from has always been male-dominated. Only recently did they start to recognize the contribution of female creatives.

 

Love what you do and enjoy every second of it. Learn everything at your own pace and avoid comparing your progress to others’.

 

Do you have any advice for other women who are aspiring to work in your field?

Love what you do and enjoy every second of it. Learn everything at your own pace and avoid comparing your progress to others’.

 


What type of music do you like to listen to?

I like to start my day with a clear mind so I have this ritual of listening to Bossa Nova or Smooth Jazz every morning while I’m having my coffee.

 

What’s your favorite local food spot?

“Yamazaki”—a humble Japanese restaurant beside a grocery store in Makati City. Their home-cooked meals remind me of my late father’s cooking.

 

Stephy Fung asks: Do you ever feel any imposter syndrome and when?

All the time! My friends know I’m a chronic over-thinker. Whenever someone praises my work, there’s always a part of me doubting my output

 

Sofie Lee asks: QUESTION

I think AI already is! The softwares we use (3D apps, compositing softwares, etc.) are all AI. With that being said, I strongly believe that there are still some things AI can’t do, especially in the creative field where spontaneity matters.

 

What question would you like us to ask the next artist?

Does art have to be meaningful all the time?

 

 

Photos courtesy of REIKA

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