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Sayuri Fujimaki

Sayuri Fujimaki

Meet artist and illustrator from Kyoto, Sayuri Fujimaki

GirlsclubAsia-Illustrator-Sayuri Fujimaki-myprofile

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I studied architecture at university and graduate school and worked at an architectural design firm. I have always loved drawing since I was a child and continued to illustrate what I felt on a daily basis, even after I started working full time. One day, I decided to leave my job to become an artist. I have been drawing people and scenes of everyday life in indigo blue ink on washi: Japanese paper.

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.

Kyoto has a good balance of old and new architecture and nature. Particularly I like how the Kamo River brings people and nature closer together and gives me various inspirations. Every time I go there for a walk, I always find something new.

 

Kyoto has a good balance of old and new architecture and nature. Particularly I like how the Kamo River brings people and nature closer together and gives me various inspirations. Every time I go there for a walk, I always find something new.

 

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?

Best parts: It’s a place where new work can be made from old: represents “carrying knowledge into new fields.” And there are many writers.

Worst parts: I found it challenging to get into the community of creators at first.

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.

Silence, sophistication, manufacturing

 

How did you start your career in art?

I did not take any special art training, but I have always loved to draw since I was a child, and it has been my lifework. I came to believe in the power of art when I learned that I could make people happy with my works by giving them gifts. I think it was only a matter of time before I started my career as an artist.

 

I did not take any special art training, but I have always loved to draw since I was a child, and it has been my lifework. I came to believe in the power of art when I learned that I could make people happy with my works by giving them gifts. I think it was only a matter of time before I started my career as an artist.

 

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?

Yes. My family and friends encouraged me, saying, “You only live once.”

 

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?

I think the endless goal for me is to continue to enjoy drawing.

I want to cherish the texture and scent of the washi, Sumi ink, and mineral pigments. Eventually, I would like to work on a larger scale and with a larger background.

 

I think the endless goal for me is to continue to enjoy drawing. I want to cherish the texture and scent of the washi, Sumi ink, and mineral pigments. Eventually, I would like to work on a larger scale and with a larger background.

 

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?

Not someone in particular, but someone involved in traditional crafts such as woodworking or dyeing and weaving.

 

What are the biggest challenges you face in working as a creative?

Keeping the passion for creation alive.

 

These women are thoughtful, dynamic, strong-willed, and sometimes childlike in their innocence.

 

How would you describe the women around you?

These women are thoughtful, dynamic, strong-willed, and sometimes childlike in their innocence.

 

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?

Since I did not aspire to be an artist when I was young, I did not know much about local female artists.

However, I did read shoujo manga: Manga for girls and was fascinated by the world created by artists such as Ai Yazawa, Rumiko Takahashi, and CLAMP. Their works opened my eyes to a new world that I had not encountered around me as a child.

 

I think I was fortunate to have two sisters. Ever since we were little, we drew pictures and showed them to each other, and sometimes we played competitions. I think they have been and will always be my family and supporters.

 

Do you have any advice for other women who are aspiring to work in your field?

I think I was fortunate to have two sisters. Ever since we were little, we drew pictures and showed them to each other, and sometimes we played competitions. I think they have been and will always be my family and supporters.

 


What type of music do you like to listen to?

ambient music

 

What’s your favorite local food spot?

Ishikawa and Toyama have delicious seafood.

 

Julia Yellow asks: What do you do when you hit the artist-blocks and what do you do to prevent burn-outs?

I visit nature such as mountains, rivers, and the ocean to get refreshed.

 

YuoNing Chien asks: Where do you want to live in the future?

I want to live in a place with beautiful lakes and mountains: places like Scandinavia.

 

What question would you like us to ask the next artist?

Where do you get your passion for creating?

 

 

Photos courtesy of Sayuri Fujimaki

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