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Anwita Citriya

Anwita Citriya

Meet artist from Bandung, Anwita Citriya

GirlsclubAsia-Illustrator-Anwita Citriya-AC

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

Hello, I’m Citriya. I make illustrations and comics with horror and psychological themes. I love exploring difficult subjects. Emotions that people would not talk about, things that most people would often avoid and stored only in the far dark corners of their minds.

 

Describe the city you’re living in and what it’s like to live there.

I was born and grew up in Bandung. I spent around four years in Jakarta for college but I moved back after I graduated. Bandung is a lovely city with mild climate, very relaxed, and the people are friendly.

 

I was born and grew up in Bandung. I spent around four years in Jakarta for college but I moved back after I graduated. Bandung is a lovely city with mild climate, very relaxed, and the people are friendly.

 

What is the best and worst thing about living in your city?

The best thing is definitely the air quality, in the morning you can actually see the sky instead of thick yellowy cloud of pollution. And how there are still a lot of trees around. The worst thing.. I’m not sure, maybe how crowded it can be during the weekend haha.

 

Give us 3 words that describe what it’s like to be a creative in your city.

Unhurried, Exciting, Passionate

 

How did you start your career in art?

I’ve been drawing all my life. I’m dyslexic so I wasn’t really good at expressing myself verbally, it also made socializing rather challenging. Drawing became my main way of expressing myself and my favorite activity to spend most of my free time with.

I studied Interior Design in college, but I felt like my heart wasn’t really in it so I decided to try my luck as a freelance illustrator after I graduated. I started posting my illustrations on Instagram and did some personal projects. Gradually I started making some comics and began posting them on webcomic platforms.

The fact that many people resonated with my story took me by surprise. I started getting emails and messages from my readers telling me how it has impacted them, I was so moved. That’s when I realized it’s what I wanted to focus on.

 

The fact that many people resonated with my story took me by surprise. I started getting emails and messages from my readers telling me how it has impacted them, I was so moved. That’s when I realized it’s what I wanted to focus on.

 

Were the people around you supportive of your decision on working as a creative?

Some are supportive, some are skeptical. My mom and grandparents told me I’m free to choose my life path as long as I’m happy. I’m lucky to have such freedom.

 

What are some goals and ambitions you have for your future work?

Having my stories adapted into a TV series or animation would be my wildest dream. But for now, I just want to give my best in creating and for my stories to reach more people.

 

Having my stories adapted into a TV series or animation would be my wildest dream. But for now, I just want to give my best in creating and for my stories to reach more people.

 

If you could collaborate with any person in the world who would it be?

Collaborating with Junji Ito would be hella (yes I love Life is Strange) awesome.

 

What are the biggest challenges you face in working as a creative?

The fact that my mood has a significant influence on my productivity. I’m a very moody person, so I struggle a lot with it. Having mental health conditions definitely make things more complicated. There are times when I can’t work at all, I find it hard to be constant as well. I’m still trying to find the best way to deal with this.

 

Bright, Strong-willed, Talented

 

How would you describe the women around you?

Bright, Strong-willed, Talented

 

Were there any local female creatives that you looked up to when you were growing up?

Growing up, I really adored the art of Japanese mangaka group “CLAMP”, I loved their intricate art and the way they tell stories. My exposure to local female artists mostly started in college, when social media–Instagram especially–has started to become a thing. Ykha Amelz and Irene Saputra were two of the artists whose works I adored.

 

Don’t be afraid to take that first step, you’ll get better as you progress. Always be curious and never stop wanting to learn new things.

 

Do you have any advice for other women who are aspiring to work in your field?

Don’t be afraid to take that first step, you’ll get better as you progress. Always be curious and never stop wanting to learn new things.

 


What type of music do you like to listen to?

I enjoy classical music, contemporary piano pieces, indie folk, and some jazz. But generally, I listen to pretty much everything, as long as it sounds good to my ears

 

What’s your favorite local food spot?

I’m a big fan of Japanese cuisine, any good Japanese restaurants would do.

 

Deborah Lee asks: What do you like most about your work?

To be able to make people feel something with my illustrations and stories.

 

Lilian Darmono asks: If you can name one moment that’s a ‘turning point’ in your artistic career, what would that be?

It was when I started publishing my comic on webcomic platform.

 

What question would you like us to ask the next artist?

What’s your favorite way to deal with burnouts?

 

 

Photos courtesy of Anwita Citriya

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